Saturday, 11 July 2009

More Mothing

Had the trap running last night in the front garden, and it was another total success! I caught c100 moths, and have so far identified 27 species.

I just have to start with my favourite of the catch...

A 1p - and more importantly - a stunning Rosy Footman

It's cousin was one of the most numerous species in the trap, there were eight of these...

Common Footman

Other firsts for the garden included....

A lovely Buff Arches

Two of these... Small Emerald

A very tatty Swallow-tailed Moth

There are at least nine more additions to my garden list to follow once they have been identified. Most of them are Beauty/Carpet-types.

Other highlights included....

A Clouded Border

Two Peppered Moths

Also a Buff Ermine, a Snout, two Early Thorns, two Dark Arches, two Flame Shoulders, two Uncertains, a Riband Wave, a Large Yellow Underwing, a Scalloped Oak, a Fanfoot, a Heart and Club, two Elephant Hawkmoths and a Popular Hawkmoth. As I have said, Common Footman was the most numerous moth, but Bright-line Brown-eyes and Spectacle Moths weren't far behind numbers wise. And if you wonder why the latter is called what it is...

Well named!

Other 'things' in the trap included a HUGE Cockchaffer and this 'flying T'...

Soooooooo cool!!! Even cooler is that it IS a moth, Emmelina monodactyla to be exact - thanks Dave : )

One more moth photo to finish this post with. A couple of days ago a neighbour popped round to inform me of two large moths mating in her back garden. They were these....

Poplar Hawkmoth porn!

My next post will include information on the rest of the catch, once they have all been identified!

3 comments:

  1. Hey Steve just in case you don't know the Flying T is a plume moth, but I don't know which one.

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  2. Hi Dave,

    Thanks buddy - I'm learning something new every hour at the moment!

    Steve :)

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  3. Hey Steve, just looked up your plume moth - it seems to be Emmelina monodactyla, but I could be wrong! Check out 'British Moths & Butterflies a photographic guide' by Chris Manley, its got lots of micros in

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